Website Data and Security, and Who to Talk to for Help

Audio Version: 10:36

Security has become a hot topic in our culture. From privacy-related suits against Google and Facebook to wholesale credit card theft from stores like Home Depot and Amazon and card skimmers at gas pumps and on ATM machines.

Our identities have become more than flesh and bones, now we have digital aliases that are vulnerable to abuse. In this new digital landscape, government jurisdictions have made significant strides to protect our privacy. The European Union passed the GDPR laws, and recently California passed the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA).

So what does this mean for a business owner? A webmaster? An eCommerce manager? In this article, we’re going to take a look at commonly collected website data, what your website security needs to accomplish, and how to know if you’re protected.

 

What kind of data is collected?

There are two primary ways that data is collected on a website. You either actively submit data into a website, or you provide data passively as you browse.

Information You Submit

Most businesses use their website as a virtual storefront for their business in real life so that they can make human-to-human connections or product-to-human connections.  Depending on the website security, some or all the information you submit can be collected on any particular website. This includes credit card and social security information. The following are types of data that is collected that you submit to a website.

Contact Forms

Most websites have a contact form where you can send an email to the business, ask some questions, or apply for a job. Here it’s common to give your name, your email, or your phone number.

eCommerce Checkout

We’re all familiar with online purchasing. Every time you make an online purchase, you’re submitting private information through a website. With eCommerce, it’s more than just your name and email, but it’s also your shipping and billing address, as well as your payment information.

Passively Shared Data

Every time you browse online, you’re creating new data points about you. Have you ever noticed that you feel like you’re being spied on by businesses that you frequently do business with or websites that you only visited? Your browsing behavior is collected through the use of “cookies.”

Cookies are little pieces of information that a browser asks to store on your computer. Usually, cookies are used to personalize your experience to give you a better experience when browsing and shopping. They’re also used to choose advertisements to display to you. If they know you like to watch football on Sunday, that may be a clue that you would be interested in some chips or chicken wings.

Website owners also use cookies to get an idea about which pages users like. If you can see which pages people don’t spend much time on, that may be a signal that the content on that page needs to be improved to help customers.

Where Does Your Website Security Need to be Implemented?

Any time data is transmitted, it’s at risk. Distilling down website security into 1 or 2 bullet points is oversimplifying the problem. You need to consider security at multiple levels of your website to provide a safe browsing experience for your users.

Let’s start with security checkpoints that are very close to your user, and gradually get further away.

On-Page Security

Spammers like to use contact forms to upload dangerous scripts to your site where they can be deployed and infect your entire website. Many contact forms use a service called ReCaptcha to help block malicious behavior from attacking your site.

reCaptcha screenshot

Every time a contact form is submitted, data is transferred. A ReCaptcha is a tool that is commonly used to verify that the form user is a human. ReCaptcha uses logic or math questions that bots may not be able to answer correctly. A correct answer helps to verify that a malicious bot isn’t trying to attack your site.

Code Level Security

Web code is regularly maintained to close security patches that malicious bots and spammers look for to spread viruses and steal data. One of the most common ways that websites become infected is by using old code. Spammers look for any website that is using out of date technology because they know exactly where the security holes are, and they can attack those vulnerabilities with ease.

Security at the website code level often means that you’re using up-to-date code, up-to-date plugins, and up-to-date CMS versions (like WordPress). Save yourself from unnecessary headaches by keeping plugins and code up-to-date, and removing old plugins and code you no longer need.

If you are using WordPress, the Dashboard has some features that help you to know if you need to upgrade some plugins, themes or your CMS. At the top left of your WordPress menu, under Dashboard, there is a notification that tells you if you have some plugins, a theme, or your CMS out of date. Or if you go to plugins, there are notifications letting you know which plugins are out of date.

This wordpress website needs to update some plugins, theme or CMS.

Also, when installing new plugins, check to see the last time the plugin was updated. If it’s been many years since the developer updated it, it’s possible that the plugin and its code is no longer maintained. This is a sign that there may be vulnerabilities in the plugin and you should try to find a different option.

Server Level Security

When a user opens your website in their browser, their browser asks the server to show the web page. If the user is filling out a contact form, that data is being transferred from your contact form to your website database. As this data is transferred, it’s vulnerable to being intercepted by malicious hackers. What if you could encode this data so that it only makes sense to your website and not to others?

At the server level, you can install an SSL certificate so that data submitted through your site is encoded, kind of like Morse code, but only your server has the key to understanding it.

Most browsers today require that your website has an SSL or your website will display to visitors as an unsecured site.  Most payment solutions will detect that your site is missing an SSL, resulting in the payment solution not displaying on your site, and eliminating the possibility to accept payments through your website.

You know your site has an SSL if your website URL starts with HTTPS instead of HTTP. Think of the extra S as meaning “Secure.” Also, browsers will often show a lock, or a shield next to your URL when it has an SSL certificate.

screenshot of a browser url bar of a site that has an SSL properly installed

It’s also a good security practice to completely block users from geographic areas that you don’t do business with. If your server detects that a website user is from a foreign country, your server can block the request from the server so that the page will not display. If you don’t do business there, there is no reason to let their hackers have access to your site. However, certain marketing channels such as Google Ads may require that your site not use geographic blocking. Talk to your digital marketing consultants about whether this applies to you.

Domain-Level Security

You can have all of the above security vulnerabilities completely closed and still be wide open to security risks because another level of security exists at the domain level.

When a website user types in your domain into their browser, there’s an extensive directory, similar to a phone book, that ensures that www.yourdomain.com shows your website, and not someone else’s.

A method called Domain Name Server (DNS) spoofing, or DNS Cache Positioning, is when your information in that extensive directory is changed. When this happens, your users think they’re logging into your eCommerce store to make a purchase, but they’re actually handing their personal information, address, and credit card information over to a thief.

There are DNS obfuscation services that can be used that will make your data in the directory hidden, and often those services will also protect you even more by not showing your real website, but a copy of it, making it all that much harder to steal your information or mimic your actual website.

Who do I talk to in order to ensure that I’m protected?

Now that you have a feel for the complexity of your website security, how do you ensure that you are protected? What other things can you do to communicate to your website users that they are safe doing business with you?

The short answer is to keep 4 people close to you: your web developer, your hosting provider, your marketing provider, and your lawyer.

Web Developer

Your web developer should be able to help you with the website level security, plugins, CMS, and technology upgrades. They should be able to help you keep up-to-date and troubleshoot any compatibility problems you may discover as you stay up to date.

Marketing Provider

In most cases, your marketing provider will be installing and using many of the plugins and technology on your site. You’ll need to work with both your web developer and marketing provider (who may be from the same company) to ensure that best practices are covered.

Hosting Provider

If you’re looking to beef up your server-level security, the first step is talking to your hosting provider. But keep in mind, they may need to upgrade the technology on your server, which may not be compatible with the code of your website. If this is the case, you should consult with both your website host as well as your developer to ensure that improving your server-level security does not break your website.

Your web host should be able to help you with your domain-level security. Your host may not actually control your domain though, but most hosting technicians understand the technology well enough to help you make the necessary configurations required to keep you safe.

For more on hosting providers, see our article, How to Choose a Hosting Provider.

Legal Representation

Nobody expects a security breach, but we do need to plan just in case. As laws are tightening down on data and its use, it would be wise to work with your lawyer to put in place a comprehensive privacy policy that your support team can help you execute. Specifically, ask them to help you write up a privacy policy that includes considerations like GDPR and California’s recently passed CCPA.

Having a website opens you up to online security risks, but you can be smart and protect yourself from many threats. That’s why we recommend that you develop strong relationships with your web developer, website host, and digital marketer and of course ask your lawyer if you are compliant with new laws. These people are the experts that stay up to date on best practices, latest news and obsess about keeping you and your customers protected.

If you have more questions on website security, we recommend that you give us a call and we can help guide you to the right people or solutions that are right for your needs.

 

Web Jargon Explained

Often, the hardest part about learning new things is learning the language. This doesn’t just apply to traveling in foreign countries. Nearly every specialized area comes with words and terms you probably hadn’t heard before you started learning about the topic. Whether you’re studying chemistry, business administration, computer science, or birdhouse building, you’re going to run into some unfamiliar words and terms that you’ll need to learn.

JM Online knows that in our industry, there are a lot of technical words, or jargon, that can make it a challenge for newcomers to engage. Our aim is to communicate the importance of your online presence, hosting, website data, and many other jargon-heavy topics.

We can’t help you see the importance of our message if the jargon is making our communication impossible to understand. So to better serve you, we’ve created this cheat sheet of common jargon. Almost every support phone call we are on includes most of these words.

Common Jargon Cheat Sheet

Hosting

The space on a server ( basically a special computer) where a website, email, mobile app, or any web-based software lives. Your home has a physical location on a piece of land, and your website files have a real location on a server.

Domain

Your website domain is the address that people type into the browser when they want to visit your website. Your domain or domain name might look like: www.mywebsitename.com

URL

A URL, or uniform resource locator, includes your domain, plus the pages and content that make up your entire website. While www.mywebsite.com is your website’s primary URL, www.mywebsite.com/services is the URL for your service page.

CMS

CMS is an acronym that stands for Content Management System. In the old days, the only way to edit your website was to edit it using HTML code. A CMS is a user-friendly way to control the content on your website without needing to know how to code. Common CMS’s include WordPress, Joomla, Square Space, Wix, Magento, Shopify, and more.

WordPress

WordPress is one of the most commonly used CMS’s. Over 27 million websites are built using WordPress. WordPress is open source, which means you don’t need to pay WordPress to use it, and anybody can develop tools or plugins that work with WordPress.

WordPress CMS Logo

Browser

A browser, or web browser, is software on your computer, phone, or tablet that allows you to look at websites. More technically speaking, a browser is software that requests information, or files, from servers to be displayed on your computer. Common browsers include Google Chrome, Firefox, Safari, Internet Explorer and Microsoft Edge.

Common Website Browser Logos

Google Analytics

Google Analytics is a tool that allows you to see how people behave once they visit your website. You can see how much traffic you’re getting, where it’s coming from, which pages are visited, and how long each visit lasts. These numbers help you understand what’s working and what needs improvement on your website.

Google Analytics Logo

Google Analytics Dashboard
Here is a basic view of the Google Analytics dashboard, and the kind of data you can expect to see.

Google My Business

Google My Business is a platform for business owners to control how their business appears on a Google Map search result. When online users search for a business “near me,” Google gives them a map result. Managing your Google My Business account ensure that your business information is accurate on the results page.

Here are some more articles about Google My Business, it’s value to you and how to set it up, click here.

Optimize your Google My Business page to

Google My Business dashboard screenshot
Here is a view of the dashboard of a Google My Business account. This gives you an idea of what kind of information that this tool provides as well as some data to help you make better decisions with your online presence.

Google Search Console / Webmaster Tools

Google Search Console (formerly Webmaster Tools) is a tool that allows you to see how people find your website using Google Search. If you want to monitor where your blog posts are ranking on Google search, ask your web manager for access to Search Console.

Google Search Console logo

Google Search Console dashboard screenshot
This is a basic view on the Google Search Console dashboard. This gives a sample of what you can expect when you visit your Search Console account.

Security Package

Security packages are unique to your provider, so make sure you ask them to explain it to you. Generally, website security packages keep unwanted traffic from accessing your website. If you’re only doing business in the USA, for example, international traffic may be blocked to eliminate the possibility of non-customers attacking your site.

Email Client

An email client is software installed onto your phone, tablet, or computer that allows you to send or receive email. Common email clients include Microsoft Outlook, and if you’re using an Apple device, Apple uses an application called Apple Mail, or just Mail.

Logos of the most common email clients

Less Frequently Used Jargon

The jargon below are words that you may not experience as frequently. These words would be something that you would hear in a conversation if you’re performing more technical work on the site, such as building a new website or trying to make your website more secure.

Dev Site

A dev site, or development site, is commonly used when a website is being rebuilt, or when a brand-new website under construction. It’s a virtual space that allows you to view the website’s progress while keeping it hidden from online users.

Website Launch

When you’re building a new website, there comes a time when you’re ready for it to go live or become accessible for online users. The process of making your site available for the public to see and use is called a website launch.

Server

A server is like a computer. Just like your computer, it has documents, images, and folders. The difference is that a server operates as a centralized resource for multiple users, while your computer is only used by whoever is logged in. A server never gets turned off, allowing computers to access its contents 24/7. Your website is a collection of files and folders that live on a server.

Caching

Caching is a process that your computer, server, or browser uses to remember data. Caching minimizes the amount of work required to load data or websites. The less work that’s required to load, the faster the data or website loads.

PCI Compliance

PCI, or Payment Card Industry, refers to the standard for data security. PCI compliance means your website meets the information security standard when credit cards are transacted through your website. If you’re taking credit card payments through your website, your hosting server needs to have a specific configuration to meet PCI compliance.

reCAPTCHA

A reCAPTCHA is a tool that is installed onto your website that determines if a visitor on your site is a human or not. Frequently used on contact forms and login pages, reCAPTCHA tools block spam bots from submitting malicious data on your website.

reCaptcha screenshot

Domain Registrar

A domain registrar is a company that reserves domain names. If you’re starting your business and you want to reserve a domain name, you’ll need to visit a domain registrar like GoDaddy or NameCheap to purchase and secure your domain name.

SSL

SSL stands for secure sockets layer. It is a secure method for connecting two computers (your device with a web browser, for example) by encrypting or codifying data so that it cannot be read or stolen. Websites with SSL certifications will display the small padlock symbol in the browser before their domain name. All websites should have this to be deemed trustworthy by today’s online standards.

This is how a browser looks when you're visiting a secure site.

Browser warning that the page you're visiting doesn't have a
If a website has an SSL but the SSL is broken, site users may see a stronger warning like this. This is because if an SSL is used to protect credit card transactions, submitting a purchase through this unprotected site could put your credit card data at risk.

For more about SSL’s and site security, click here.

HTTP

HTTP or HyperText Transfer Protocol is a set of rules that are used to transfer data over the web. When you visit a website, your browser is sending messages formatted in HTTP.

HTTPS

Similar to HTTP, but HTTPS sends messages securely using an SSL so that data cannot be stolen.

As a website owner or future website owner, you will sooner or later become involved in technical conversations in order to improve your online presence. We want you to be confident and able to engage with your technology. Understanding these words and terms will help you make the best decisions possible for your hosting, website data, email, and everyday website problems.

How to Choose the Right Hosting Solution

Whether you’re a marketing director or business owner at some point you’ll consider website hosting.

For most, web hosting is set up and then forgotten. You probably know you need a host for your website to work online, several companies offer the service, and the fee is minimal.

All of that is true – but often business owners just want to get started so they sign up for something basic. Later they later discover some limitations and want to customize their plan, giving them more to consider.

We’re going to take a deeper look at why choosing the right website hosting matters and answer questions like:

  • When do I go with the DIY hosting solutions like GoDaddy or Blue Host?
  • When do I choose a web hosting company with in-house technicians?

Let’s start by considering your needs.

What are my web hosting needs?

Before you can decide if a DIY web host or a full-service hosting solution is best, you need to think about what you need on a daily basis.

Depending on the type of industry you’re in, you might require special treatment for sensitive information. Think HIPPA or PCI compliance. If you plan on accepting credit card payments, you payment solution may require you to be hosted on a PCI compliant server. That might be more difficult to ensure using a DIY service.

Does your website get spikes during certain times of the year? Think Black Friday or Cyber Monday. DIY web host solutions aren’t always clear on how you can manage your resources.

Will you get more resources allocated to your site when you need it? During a heavy traffic spike, when you should be making money, your website could freeze – cases like this are why some businesses prefer hiring a professional hosting solutions team.

Some other important questions:

  • Do you have international users?
  • Do you need the ability to set up subdomains or development sites?
  • Will you want to deploy a mobile app?
  • Do you want email addresses with your domain name?
  • Do you send newsletter blasts from your domain?

I don’t get a lot of traffic on my website

If you’re starting out or serve a niche market, your website may not be getting a lot of daily traffic.

If your site is basic or you make some small changes periodically using WordPress or Joomla, you may not need many configurations, and a DIY solution like GoDaddy, Bluehost or FlyWheel may be a great solution for you.

With that said, it’s a good idea to be aware of the basic minimum best practices for today’s web. For example, all websites should have an SSL. An SSL is a tool that encrypts information to make it difficult to steal. Most browsers tell site visitors if an SSL is present. For example, next to the URL in your browser you’ll see either lock icons or shields to tell users that this site has an SSL and is secure:

If a site is not secure, you would see these icons:

You don’t want your users to feel like their security is at risk when they visit your site. For more on SSL’s, see our blog post, Does Your Website Need an SSL Certificate?

In addition, it’s a good idea to set up a spam filter when you’re setting up your email hosting.

If you’re planning for the future and expect to grow, include periodic upgrades as needed in your growth plan. Or you can avoid needing to migrate your site once it has matured and is more difficult to manage, by starting with local web hosting professionals.

My website gets a lot of traffic

If you know your website is getting a lot of traffic or experiences traffic spikes, you may require more advanced configurations. There are a number of hosting solutions that can ensure that your site stays fast when it’s under load.

Ensuring you’re on a dedicated server eliminates the conflict with other websites experiencing high volumes and gives you access to your server’s full resources at all times.

If you have a high-volume site, consider setting up an efficient caching plan. Caching is a technique that allows your server to store a snapshot of your site instead. When your site experiences high volume, caching can greatly reduce the workload of your server and help your site load faster for your users. Here are some tips on how to make your site fast.

Often server-level caching is executed using a CDN (content delivery network). A CDN is a network of servers that are distributed worldwide that store snapshots of your website. This way, your website is geographically close to any worldwide user so that during peak traffic hours your international users will experience the fastest site you can serve them.

A CDN has the added benefit of providing email obfuscation, hiding email addresses from page crawlers, like email harvesters and spambots, looking for email addresses on your pages that they can add to spam email lists.

Should I use a dedicated server?

Like most things, the answer is – it depends. By now, you have a sense of some of the considerations to make when determining if a DIY host solution or a full-service host solution is right for you. Let’s recap the important takeaways to this point.

  • Most out of the box DIY hosting solutions are on a server that’s shared by many other domains. This means you’re all sharing resources that are engineered to the needs of multiple sites, not customized to your needs.
  • When you’re on a dedicated server, you get 100% of the server resources at all times.
  • If your payment processor requires PCI compliance, you’ll likely need your own dedicated server.
  • If your industry requires special treatment of information, such as HIPPA compliance, you may require additional customizations that need to be done on a dedicated server.

Can I do it myself?

Again, it depends. Basic websites with a small traffic volume can probably be managed by a curious person and a lot of YouTube videos using a solution like GoDaddy.

But as your website grows in traffic volume and the complexity of your needs grow, you may want to consider reaching out to a local web hosting professional for guidance and support. There are some important questions to consider before you commit to the DIY approach.

  • Do you want a local (human) expert to help you in real-time when you need it?
  • Do you want expert support to help when making upgrades and adjustments?
  • Do you know how to configure the solutions that are right for you?
  • Do you have the time to learn hosting technology so you can solve problems when they arise?
  • How much of your time can you put into hosting management every week?

 

As you can see, choosing the right hosting solution for your website takes some thought. Do your prep work upfront so as you grow you can position yourself to provide for your needs as they arise.

In general, if your website doesn’t get a lot of traffic, and doesn’t handle sensitive information, a DIY solution could be the best choice. If your website is growing, plans to grow, and handles sensitive information, a local web hosting provider is probably going to be the better long-term solution.

5 Ways to Spot a Phishing Attempt

Phising is an attack often used to steal user data, ranging from email addresses, to login credentials, to credit card numbers, to Social Security numbers. The attacker disguises themselves as a trusted entity and uses this credibility to trick users into opening an email or text message that can lead to the installation of malware, a ransomware attack or the reveal of sensitive data. It can be difficult to spot a phishing attempt quickly, so here are 5 ways to spot a phishing attempt to help protect your email and your computer from the nasty effects of a phishing attack. phishing attack icon

Message URLs are Mismatched or Misleading

It’s not uncommon that a phishing message contains a URL which looks valid. Hover your mouse over the top of the URL to see the hyperlinked address, and if the hyperlinked address is different than the address displayed, it’s likely malicious. Additionally, look for misleading domain names. Attackers often utilize big names like Apple or Microsoft in a domain name to disguise a malicious link. The DNS naming structure is ChildDomain.FullDomain.com. An example would be, info.LegitDomain.com. A phishing attempt, on the other hand, would restructure to FullDomain.com.MaliciousDomain.com. For example, Microsoft.com.MaliciousDomain.com.

Spelling and Grammar Errors

Any official message sent from a legitimate company will likely be reviewed for spelling, grammar and legality. If a message is full of errors it’s likely malicious, so delete it!

It Gets Too Personal

If an email is requesting personal information, be wary. A reputable company will never request a password, credit card number, or security question. It’s even be likely that a phishing attempt will request money to cover expenses, taxes or fees.

You Didn’t Initiate the Contact

If you receive an email stating you were selected as a winner for a lifetime supply of magical, age-reversing skin care, but you never heard of the company and you never entered the contest… delete it. If you are announced as a winner or provided a promotional opportunity, but never initiated contact with the company, it’s a scam. And, if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.

Unrealistic Threats

Some phishing attacks use intimidation to trick people into giving up sensitive data. Some key phrases for these messages include, “Urgent Action Required!” Your account has been compromised!” “Your account will be closed!” Scammers pose as banks, credit card providers, email providers and government agencies to scare people. Financial institutions and government agencies will not request sensitive data over email, so do not be tricked! If something just doesn’t look right in an email, trust your gut reaction and delete the email. It’s always helpful to have an email hosting support team to assist in identifying phishing attacks. We take website security and email security seriously. Many email hosting support teams are not readily available to offer quick advice or assistance in the event of a phishing attack. But, it’s just one of the many benefits you get when you choose our Omaha website hosting team – real human support when you need it!

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New Website Launch: Heartland Oncology & Hematology

Heartland Oncology & Hematology is dedicated to serving and caring for their patients. Its new website is an informational marketing piece to provide information to those seeking care; and it’s minimalistic, clean design allows for just that.

Heartland Oncology & Hematology’s new website is a pre-built WordPress content management system that uses responsive technology – qualifying for Google’s mobile-friendly website standards. Our Omaha web design team also built an interactive map, helping users in Nebraska and Iowa find a convenient location.

As with all our clients, we are thankful that Heartland Oncology & Hematology trusted our web design Omaha team to build a new website, and we wish them success with this new marketing tool.

View Heartland Oncology & Hematology Website

New Website Launch: NNDC

Northwest Nebraska Development Corporation of Chadron and Crawford develops and sells plots of land, stimulating economic and job growth. As an entity that seeks to provide information and education to local residence, NNDC needs a website with clean layout and functionality – as well as one that will be easy to update.

This website was built on a WordPress content management system, which provides the ability for growth and easy updating on the part of NNDC. The website is also responsive and is considered mobile-friendly. Additional features include a custom google map on the homepage which syncs between Google and the website; as well as the Sites & Building’s page which includes a 3rd party software that embeds the development listing.

Informational websites take additional planning for design and structure, and we’re grateful that NNDC chose JM to develop this website and look forward to working with them in the future!

View NNDC website

New Website Launch: Outdoor Tire


Outdoortire.com is a new business started by seasoned tire professionals looking to provide their product directly to consumers with affordable pricing and excellent customer service. Seeing the growing opportunity to provide this product through an ecommerce website, Outdoortire.com exists to make consumers’ lives a bit easier when tire shopping.

Being a new business, JM’s Omaha design team first designed their logo and brand. The Outdoortire.com website is built on a WordPress Content Management System and uses a WooCommerce ecommerce plugin. The site is a pre-built WooCommerce template customized to fit their needs. It utilizes an advanced search plugin for better user experience, and a LiveChat feature to provide excellent customer service.

We wish Outdoortire.com great success with their new ecommerce business. Our Omaha web design team is excited to see it grow and succeed!

View Outdoor Tire Website

New Website Launch: Countertops Unlimited

Countertops Unlimited

Countertops Unlimited is a family-owned Omaha business who was in need of a new logo and updates website to better serve their wholesale and retail customers. After undergoing a rebranding effort with our Omaha design team and building a new responsive website, Countertops Unlimited is searching for a better online presence. (more…)

New Website Launch: Senior Insurance

senior-insurance-top

Seniors Insurance is a second generation family owned business out of Loveland, Colo. Seniors Insurance works with insurance agents to provide education materials, as well as with seniors looking for Medicare and Medicare Supplemental Insurance coverage in Colorado, Montana and Wyoming. Realizing that the market is changing, and more seniors and agents are looking for education online, Seniors Insurance recently built their first website with our Omaha web design team.

(more…)

New Website Launch: CASA for Douglas County

CASA For Douglas County

CASA for Douglas County is a nonprofit organization that trains and supports volunteers to represent the best interests of victims of child abuse, neglect, and severe domestic conflict. Our Omaha web design team partnered with CASA to provide them with an updated website to build credibility and gain support.

(more…)